Shopping Advice: How to Take Your Own Body Measurements


Shopping Advice: How to Take Your Own Body Measurements
Are you wondering if your find on our site is the right one for you? Have you fallen in love with a piece, but aren't sure if it will fit? We've compiled a cheat sheet to help you take the most common clothing measurements on your own. 

THE "VINTAGE" DIFFERENCE: 

Vintage sizing varies so it's important to know your measurements for the proper fit. A size 8 might fit differently if it's a 1960's garment versus a 1990's one. We take as many measurements as possible and include them in our item descriptions so that you can compare them to yours.

THE GIVE AND TAKE OF MEASURING: 

We are going to show you how to take your own measurements because it's not often that you'll have someone to do it for you. But taking your own measurements requires skill. If you measure too tight, you'll end up with a garment that fits tight. But if you measure too loose, you could have a piece that's way too big. Always use fabric measuring tape because you have more control over it. Use approximately 1-2 fingers to add spacing between your body and the measuring tape. And always measure around the fullest parts of your body for accurate sizing.

HOW TO TAKE YOUR OWN MEASUREMENTS:

Bust

Slide the measuring tape behind your back, holding it from the smallest measurement to the largest. Shift the measuring tape to your upper back and stretch it around the fuller part of the bust. Write down the measurement you get where the tape meets. 

Waist

Using your hands, feel your sides until you find the part where your ribs start to narrow. Shift the measuring tape behind that part of your back, holding it from the smallest measurement to the largest. Stretch it around to the front of your waist, making sure to keep in line with your original placement, and write down the measurement you get where the tape meets. 

Hips

Slide the measuring tape behind the fullest part of your butt, holding it from the smallest measurement to the largest. Stretch it around to the front of your hips, making sure to keep in line with your original placement, and write down the measurements you get where your tape meets. 

Sizing Chart for Women's Clothing

Rise

The rise has to do with how far a pant comes up on your body. For example, you might see pants referred to as high rise, mid-rise or low rise in most retail stores. For this measurement, simply measure from the start of your thigh upwards according to the measurement on the pant we've listed. This will let you know how far the pants will come up on your hips/waist.

Pro Tip: Stand in front of a mirror when you take this measurement so that you can easily see where the measurement stops. And remember, there are plenty of cool ways to make mom jeans look sleek and trendy. Think about pairing a 
high-rise pant with a cropped top for a fun, tummy covering look. 

Inseam

The inseam has to do with how long a pant leg is on your body. For example, you might see pants referred to as short, regular or long lengths. Most standard lengths are 30" for short, 32" for regular, and 34" for long. For this measurement, simply measure from the start of your thigh towards the ankle according to the measurement on the pant we've listed.

Pro Tip: If you are doing this on your own and can't dangle your head down to take the measurement, it might be easier if you are sitting down with your legs outstretched. In some cases, it's okay if a pant is a little short. If you have a straight leg jean, for example, you can always roll the bottom hem a little to make a cool cropped look. 

Garment Length

Whether you're measuring for a shirt or a dress, knowing the garment length is great so that you know how long an item will be on you. Start your measurement at the top of your shoulder and measure the length downwards according to the measurement on the item we've listed.

Pro Tip: Make sure to measure over those fuller parts of your body, because those will affect length as well. But don't count an item out of it's not exactly the length you want. Imagine how you can layer it. Short shirts look great with high-waist skirts. Shorter dresses can be belted and paired with leggings or skinny leg jeans. 

Sleeve Length

To find out how long a sleeve will be on you, measure from the top of the shoulder and down the length of the arm according to the measurement on the item we've listed.

Pro Tip: Don't dismiss an item if you think it's going to be too short. Long sleeved shirts that aren't long enough for you could possibly be rolled to make a ¾ length sleeve.  

Shoulder Width

The shoulder width is the distance from the curve of your shoulder downwards. If you aren't sure how far you are supposed to measure, feel your shoulder. When you feel the bend from where your shoulder meets your arm you are at the point of measurement. Hold the smallest measurement on your measuring tape to the curve of your shoulder and measure down your arm. Write down the measurement you get.

If you are having issues taking measurements or still have questions about the style and fit of an item, you can click the Friends Chat link on the bottom left hand corner of the page. If you have any comments about how this guide has helped you, email us at support@notyourmamasvintage.com. Until the next time, happy shopping! 


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